CANADIAN RELIC

“I’ve never heard of those before. “Neat find”. . . “Very cool find – I’d be thrilled with that one” . . . “I assume they were popular things in the past”


If you don’t know what the artefact is and cannot guess, then read on

Canadian Metal Detecting

Click on the Logo

Most of the finds made by our Colonial Cousins may seem inconsequential and somewhat insignificant to the UK detectorist. Canada may not have the history that English detectorists dig up, but often what they DO find can be interesting and adds social interest and understanding to the past.

The last time I visited the forum, a post by Vlad (Lonely Wolf) drew my attention. Judging by his heading this was a relatively common find and he was looking forward to unearthing another. This is what he said and the pictures he posted.

. . . Just wanna share another cool relic. First I thought it was a spring scale, then a gun powder dose measurer – but nope. It turned out to be a coin bank or coin holder for dimes from 1940s, and can hold up to 5 dollars. 

Lonely Wolf: Signature – ‘History is waiting for those who are looking for it.’

Vlad – My First Coin Holder

Interesting facts

Notice the slot on top of tube for the dimes. The holes were there so you could see how many had been collected. The amounts were beside these holes. When five dollars had been saved you turned the screw on the top and the bottom popped out to claim your dimes. Then you would push the bottom back in the tube and start saving again. Just imagine what you could buy for five dollars back in the 1940’s. 

After doing a little research, Vlad shared this fact: “People in the USA used to send these coin banks full of dimes to president Roosevelt to help fight the war on polio.” Collecting those dimes was so successful that in 1938 they helped form a nationwide organisation, the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, later renamed the March of Dimes. Vlad also found this page from a catalogue of 1936 advertising ‘the new octagonal model’.


My Coin Tower

I wonder if any UK detectorists have ever found one of these. They were very popular when I was a kid. My father gave me one, but I’ve mislaid it – it looked like this”

Examples From eBay

There are several examples of B & R MFG CO of the New York metal coin dime tube bank. Here’s a couple.

Vlad says: “Relic hunting and research of the finds is real fun!”

15 thoughts on “CANADIAN RELIC”

  1. Another great article John, As a kid I remember getting a Christmas present of a tube coin holder for farthings, I also believe that the banks or post offices used to give out these coin tubes to encourage youngsters to save. I remember about 65 ish years ago the post office issued national savings stamps booklets to the schools for the kids to save their pocket money.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I had one of those when I was a lad John.. the principle of using the screw was a good one it its’ day.. However, when you are young and that toy/candy/whatever just had to be purchased and you had enough in the coin bank but not enough to use the screw, you figure out a way.. and that was to hold the coin bank, tip it upside down and then turn it over rapidly and shake at the same time.. always works like a charm!! LOL

    Micheal

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great write up John, glad to see you’re still hard at it my friend. This was an interesting find by Vlad, the only disappointment was that it wasn’t full of silver dimes from the 1940s. – Dave

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Woooohooooo……….love that logo John! LOL….

    Thanks for doing a blog on one of our own.

    Your £ container sure looked a lot more regal than anything we ever had.

    Liked by 1 person

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